ARCHITECTURE - Teaching 2008

Rennaissance to Baroque Architecture in Italy

A series of 12, 2 hour lectures which in the context of the Graeco-Roman traditions of Urbanity examines the works of major architects from Brunelleschi to Borromini.

© SK 2008
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Themes, Elements and Ideas

A series of 10, 2 hour lectures in appreciation of 20 th.Century architecture and some of its major figures.

© SK 2008
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Architecture Teaching 2008

UNSW Master of Architecture Studio 2008 Two semesters of studios taught in collaboration with Alan Ogg, architect.

© SK 2008
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STUDY 1 / Light, Shade and Shadow

A light cube

30x30x30 cm white cardboard cube as illustrated in diagram A. Surfaces to be divided as specified and cuts to be made only on the grid lines in a rectilinear geometry.

Requirements:

  1. Choose a direction of light – simulate with a desk lamp or strong torch.
  2. Choose a viewing position and opening.
  3. Imagine that the space in the cube is an interior.
  4. What happens inside is to be designed by you to create the maximum effect.
  5. Divide the four vertical faces in alternatively even and odd numbers: 3,4,5 & 6 or 8,9,10 & 11 resulting in square grids.
  6. The top surface is to relate in a way you devise to the four vertical surfaces.
  7. Experiment with openings in one or more of these 5 faces.
  8. External projections can be no more than 1 unit on the face.

Objective:

To manipulate light or reveal the play of light and shadows in a fascinating way. A way which takes advantage of the formal possibilities of the cube.

Criteria:

Well made, accurate, clean and with precise joints and connections.

References:

The Pantheon, Rome. Hagia Sophia, Istambul
Borromini, Guarini, Baroque architecture in general
Le Corbusier - La Tourette, Ronchamp, Firminy
Aalto - Libraries
Kahn - Unitarian Church, Kimbell, Exeter.
Holl - Church
Utzon, Bagsvaerd Church, House in Majorca

Sketches, small studies and mock ups will be needed before you assemble the final model.

© SK 29.7.2008

Illustrations on right are projects carried out by students at UNSW in 2007 and 2008

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STUDY 2 / Geometry

Geometry - how is it manifested in Architecture?
What kinds are there?
Where is it used?
Do these things matter?

Exercise 1.

On A2 fine white Board do a pencil drawing employing variations
a. on the Square.
b. Circles or parts of circles.
c. 60 degree triangular geometry

Exercise 2.

On a similar board do a drawing which combines at least 2 of the geometries from Ex 1.

Exercise 3.

Based on this, make a study model in 3 dimensions as an architectural idea.

You may interpret any of these as studies of: ornament and decoration, architectural elements or as planning, setting out or organizational Ideas.

Materials:

Pencils - 3H, 2H, H and F. Coloured Pencils can also be used.
Thick white paper or board


References:

  1. Islamic, Chinese Ornament - Numbers, Meaning, Symbolism
  2. Renaissance: Brunelleschi, Palladio {Proportion, Harmony}
  3. Baroque : Borromini, Guarini
  4. Modern: Wright - triangular, hexagonal, circular geometries
  5. Le Corbusier - the Modulor {the Golden Mean and a variable geometry}
  6. Kahn - the square
  7. Utzon- Spherical geometries of the Opera House
  8. Buckminster Fuller - Geodesic domes and tetrahedral geometries
  9. Gehry - Fragmented /sculptural

Parti diagrams studying geometry overlaid over plans, sections, elevations of the building you are studying as a model.


© SK 4.8.2008

Illustrations on right are projects carried out by students at UNSW in 2008

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STUDY 3 / Inside, Outside & In-between

Exercise 3.1.

With the drawings of your Project 1 building do a tracing which clearly shows relation between interiors and what Van Eyck calls “ In-between” spaces. Make a clear image of the environment - the surroundings and the transition from outside to inside.
Use colour to differentiate these 3 places.
RED = Inside, GREY = In-between, GREEN = Outside

Exercise 3.2.

A. Find examples of the architectural elements of many traditions which give expression to the act of assembling before and entering a building. eg the Porch, the Verandah, the Colonnade, the Portico, the Ante-room, the Entry, the Door.

B. Choose a house from your country which demonstrates the relation between inside , outside and in-between. Present this with plans and sections and illustrations on A2 boards. Pay particular attention to elements such as : the balcony, the terrace, the courtyard, the garden, the roof terrace or garden, the belvedere and the look out. Relate to Climatic considerations, customs and local tradition.

C. Make a model of your own design that in a conceptual and dramatic way demonstrates an architectural relation between these 3 "Places" - Outside, In-between, Inside. The model should be on a base 300 x 600 mm or 600 x 600 mm at a scale of your choice.

References:

Post and Beam traditions: China, Japan, Pacific
Thick Wall traditions: Africa, Middle East, Greece, Italy , Underground Houses - China, Cappadocia [Turkey]
Modern Architecture: Wright - Houses - ["The outside comes inside"]
Mies Van De Rohe - Farnsworth, Berlin Gallery
Le Corbusier - Pilgrimmage Church, Ronchamp
Kahn: Bryn Mawr college, Exeter Library - Inside
Utzon ; Bagsvaerd church, Sydney Opera house - [the platform, inside & inside]
Van Eyck. Sculpture pavilion
Tadao Ando, Stephen Holl, Alvaro Siza , etc


Ronchamp photos by S.K.
Chandigargh photos by M.Halperin.

© SK 21.8.2008
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Le Corbusier - Chandigargh - High Court
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Chandigargh - The great Porch of the Parliament
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UNSW Master of Architecture Studio 2008 Semester 2. Project 1. Study of a Master Work

Teacher: Swetik Korzeniewski / Duration: Weeks 1-7


Aim:

To carefully study a work by a master on the premise that we learn about Architecture from Architecture. The study and understanding of architectural works and even more so the experience of great architecture is fundamental to ones development as an architect.

Suggested procedure:

1.1 Documentation - assemble a thorough coverage of as many aspects of the work as possible. Plans, sections and elevations are essential as well as photos, interiors, 3d drawings. Location and site /climate info. Make a file which is easily viewed. Library and internet research.

1.2 Sketches - Begin a conversation with the building by doing quick freehand sketches of views, plans and sections. Small study models quickly made.

1.1 & 1.2 Wk 3 Review

2.1 Parti drawings of its organisation.

2.2 Drafted drawings - In pencil [3H,2H, H, F, HB] and by hand do a careful set of drawings on white paper. Coloured pencils may be used to clarify things.

These are the Poche drawings that reveal the materiality and character of the building. Plans, sections and elevations. 1:50, 1:100 These are the “Working Drawings” from which you will build your model. NB Computer drawings are not acceptable for this purpose.

2.1 & 2.2 Wk 5 Review

3.1 Study Model - A study model in balsa or cardboard which presents the form of the building [ie the relationships between its major parts and conveys its visual character.]

3.2 Photos of model - 3 views with correct light angles, 1 Interior


SELECTED WORKS

  1. Le Corbusier - Villa Cook, Paris, France 1926-29
  2. Le Corbusier - Villa Shodhan, Ahmedabad, India 1955-56
  3. Scarpa - Canova Museum, Possagno, Italy. 1955-57
  4. Wright - Falling Water , Bear Run, Pa. USA 1934-37
  5. Rietveld - Schroeder House, Utrecht, Holland 1923-24
  6. Kahn - Esherick House, Chestnut Hill, Pa. USA 1959-61
  7. Venturi - Mothers House, Chestnut Hill. Pa. USA 1959-64
  8. Le Corbusier - Zurich Pavilion, Switzerland 1964-65
  9. Le Corbusier - Unite d’Habitation, Marseille, France 1951-
  10. Le Corbusier - Villa Curutchet, la Plata, Argentina 1949
  11. Kahn - First Unitarian Church, Rochester NY USA. 1959-67
  12. Utzon - Bagsvaerd Church, Bagsvaerd, Denmark 1967-76

MODELS BY

  1. Kewell Zhu
  2. Jouzy Backer
  3. Pop Natthapol
  4. Nicole Liu
  5. Mandy Hu
  6. Veronica Yang
  7. Amy Wu
  8. Xin Wei Yang
  9. Angela Law
  10. Giuliana Cayllahua
  11. Ian Zheng
  12. Ting Zhao
© SK 2008
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Venturi- Mothers house.jpg
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UNSW Master of Architecture Studio 2008 Semester 2. Project 2. A Library in Newtown

Teacher: Swetik Korzeniewski / Duration: 8 Weeks

This project continues, at a smaller scale, the consideration of buildings with a civic purpose. In this case the purpose and significance of the public library to the intellectual and cultural life of a community.


1. PLACE:

This project is located in one of the few Residential Squares in Sydney - Hollis Park in Newtown which has large Victorian houses on 2 sides. Newtown is a very cosmopolitan inner city district close to Sydney University.

2. PURPOSE:

The purpose that a library serves and the facilities and spaces that are needed to serve that purpose are to be considered and clearly articulated as part of your contribution to forming the brief.

3. PROGRAM:

A suggested list of spaces is attached. However you are advised to formulate the general character and disposition of the spaces before you start detailed planning. Start with a whole rather than with a lot of parts.


Main considerations;

1. This will be a first sketch plan in which you state clearly and strongly your overall idea for this Library.

a. THE CHARACTER OR EXPRESSION OF A LIBRARY
• Both Internally and Externally and therefore

b. ITS RELATION TO THE PARK - WHAT DOES IT CONTRIBUTE

c. THE INTERNAL ORGANISATION AND TREATMENT OF MAJOR SPACES
• Not all the detailed planning is expected to be resolved.


MODELS BY

  1. Nicole Liu - 5 study models
  2. Nicole Liu - Library view from NE
  3. Nicole Liu
  4. Ting Zhao - 4 study models
  5. Ting Zhao
  6. Giuliana Cayllahua - Library
  7. Kewell Zhu - Site model
  8. Kewell Zhu - Library view from North
  9. Amy Wu - Library, 5 study models
  10. Ian Zheng
  11. Jouzy Backer - Library view from North
  12. Mandy Hu - View from NE
  13. Mandy Hu - Aerial view

4. Presentation Requirements

Location plan, Site Plan
Floor plans 1:100
Sections 1:100 or 1:50 (2 min.)
Elevations 1:100 (2 min, more if time allows)
Model 1:200 or 1:100
Photomontage: 2 views or sketch perspectives

N.B. One drawing is to be given special emphasis with an effort to produce the highest quality drawing.


5. PRECEDENT:

EACH STUDENT IS TO CHOOSE A LIBRARY TO STUDY AND TO PRESENT TO THE CLASS:

  1. Laurentian library, Florence - Michelangelo , 1527
  2. Library at San Marco, Venice - Sansovino, 1537
  3. Radcliffe Camera, Oxford. Gibbs
  4. University of Virginia, library, Charlottesville, Jefferson
  5. Breakfast Room/library, London. Soane
  6. Project for a Library, France. Boullee
  7. Trinity College Library, Dublin. Burgh 1732
  8. Bibliotheque S. Genevieve, Paris. Labrouste 1845
  9. National Library, Paris 1862
  10. Mitchell Library, Sydney

20 th C examples

  1. Stockholm Municipal library Asplund 1924
  2. Libraries Aalto
  3. History library, Cambridge. Stirling & Gowan
  4. Philips Academy library, Exeter. Kahn 1972
  5. Public Library, Hollywood. Gehry 1983
  6. Public library St. Juan Capistrano. Graves 1982
  7. Library, Munster, Germany. Wilson
© SK 8.09.2008
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Comments are welcome and can be made via the contact form.
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